A guide to your pet's vaccinations

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August is National Immunisation Awareness Month!

We at Felcana always want you and your pets to be healthy, happy, and connected. As responsible pet owners, we need to make sure that we keep on top of our pet’s vaccinations every year. Your vet can go through it with you in more detail, but here are some of the vaccines you’ll likely receive on your visit.

 

Common vaccines for your dog:

Your dog will get a vaccine that lasts one year or three years without needing a booster. There are four core vaccines your dog will receive, and a few that may be given based on the risk profile of your dog.

Canine Distemper Virus vaccine: Protects against a very contagious and aggressive virus, but one that is very easily prevented through vaccination

Infectious Canine Hepatitis vaccine: Protects against a painful viral infection of the kidneys, which is spread to dogs from foxes

Canine Parvovirus vaccine: While this virus mainly affects puppies, the vaccine protects all dogs from life threatening fever, diarrhoea and vomiting

Leptospirosis vaccine: Protects against a bacterial infection that, if left untreated, can lead to multiple organ failure in the dog

These vaccines may or may not be given:

Bordatella Bronchiseptica: If you put your dog into a boarding kennel, they may require this vaccine to protect against “Kennel cough”, a group of infections causing respiratory symptoms. As the number of pets going to dog walkers and interacting with other dogs increases, many vets are offering this along with all the other core vaccines.

Lyme Disease vaccination: If you live in an area with a heavy tick population, this vaccine may be given to your dog to prevent Lyme disease

 

Common vaccines for your cat:

Feline Enteritis vaccine: This vaccine protects against spread of the disease from other cats. This is a very serious disease for kittens, but every age of cat is susceptible. This virus attacks the immune system, making the cat more open to secondary infections.

Cat Flu vaccine: Though this is most commonly seen in kittens, cat flu can affect every age of cat. The virus causes general flu symptoms (sneezing, runny nose, fever, vomiting, diarrhoea, anorexia, etc.) but this vaccine prevents infection in your cat

Feline Leukaemia vaccine: Protects against a virus spread through contact with infected cats. This disease causes a variety of symptoms, ranging from loss of appetite and weight loss, to bone marrow infections.

These vaccines may or may not be given:

Bordatella Bronchiseptica vaccine: Like the vaccine in dogs, this is required by catteries if you put your cat into boarding kennels to prevent against “kennel cough”, a highly contagious respiratory infection.

Clamydophila Felis vaccine: This protects against an infection that causes severe red, swollen, weepy eyes and upper respiratory signs in cats. This may or may not be given to every cat, but in areas where it is endemic, the vaccine may be encouraged.

 

What if I travel with my pets?

If you plan to travel abroad with your pets, you may be required to get the following vaccines to protect your pet:

Rabies: Even though the UK has eradicated rabies, if you are travelling to a country that still has rabies, it is required by law for your pet to be vaccinated against rabies.

Leishmaniasis vaccine: This protects against a parasite infection that dogs and cats can spread to humans. If our animal travels to areas where this is common, it is recommended you get this vaccine

 

There are a lot of nasty viruses and infections out in the world that can do serious harm to our beloved pets! Thankfully, it’s easy to avoid these with a simple yearly vaccine. As always, talk to your veterinarian for their specific recommendations and make an appointment to see your vet if you have any concerns for your pet!